Thursday, May 23, 2013

An Important Note about Animal Protein

A friend of mine reminded me that not all eggs are created equal.

She took acceptance to my use of the term ‘friendly’ when describing eggs because of the deplorably inhumane conditions that the majority of egg-laying hens endure for their entire lives.

Indeed, if you were to see the living conditions of most farm animals, and you had an ounce of compassion, you’d be very tempted to become a vegetarian.

I agree with her 100%.  And I haven't mentioned this in much of my writing, because I will admit, I assumed it was a given. But she reminded me that most people still go to the grocery store for their animal products. And I find this unacceptable.

In fact, many years ago, when I first learned of what goes into the production of our supermarket meats and diary products, I swore off of them entirely. But then I got sick and was told by my doctor that, due to my blood type and my activity level, I needed to have meat in my diet to thrive.

I then discovered that there were still certain farms that treated their animals with compassion. And for me, it was not only worth the extra money, but it was really the only option I’d consider. After seeing some of the sickening and disturbing images in movies like “Food, Inc.” “Food Matters” and “Forks Over Knives” and many, many others, it was clear that I would not support that industry.

So now, whenever you see me referencing meats or eggs that I’m eating, you can be sure that they come from a local farm that is committed to raising animals in ways consistent with their species.

I believe that this is not only the spiritually correct thing to do, but that on a physical level, the nutrition supplied by a humanely raised animal is different than that supplied by an animal subjected to what amounts to a lifetime of painful torture and constant fear and discomfort.

If I could not find sources of animal protein that I did not trust came from farms practicing animal compassion, I would not be eating animal protein. It takes a little extra time and some research, and usually a bit more money, to find and buy animal products from these sources, but it is something that I feel is definitely worth it.

If you think I’m over reacting, I urge you to watch some of the films I’ve referenced above.  You’ll learn that this is not just a new-age, hippy problem, but a serious problem affecting the entire globe. I would hope that it would be impossible for you to watch these films without squirming and feeling a little ill.

If you're interested in pursuing more humanely raised animal products, I highly encourage you to make it a commitment in your healthy lifestyle.  Here are some links to get you started.

Five Humane Labels

A Label to Look For

One Example of a Humane Ranch / Farm

But your research should be ongoing and diligent, as mine is. You do NOT want to be nourishing your body with the flesh from animals who have spent their entire, tortured lives under stress. Stress is real and damaging and unhealthy.


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